one year in…

It’s been about a year since the Majacraft Aura entered my life. I picked up the box from the post office on a Thursday and rushed home to put it together. That weekend I was heading to Pittsburgh, so I didn’t have a chance to spend a lot of time with it. My first experiences weren’t great – I thought I’d put it together wrong. But, after a significant amount of panicking and reading posts on the Majacraft Ravelry forum, eventually things started to make sense. Since then I’ve focused primarily on two-ply, singles, and corespinning since that is my comfort zone. I feel like there are still so many more things to do with it, but I’m not sure how to get more information. However, it’s better knowing there is more to learn rather than feeling like I’ve already done everything there is to do.

Last weekend I had the opportunity to go to The Woolery in Frankfort, Kentucky. Even though I have been buying from them for years, I never stepped into their store. It was beautiful! Not as big as I would have thought, but the staff was very helpful and pulled out all sorts of things for me to see. I had wanted to get some gadgets for my Aura such as a smaller whorl or possibly the overdrive head. I ended up with the lace flyer kit, which contains the whorl, flyer, and two fat core bobbins. Also, I picked up some cotton and cashmere for blending, linen yarn, hemp fiber, a fox/wool bend, and a Nancy’s Knit Knacks Lazy Kate. Oh yes, and two yards of gorgeous wool fabric.



The night we got home, after unpacking, I tried out the new lace flyer. Taking off the standard whorl/flyer and switching to the lace whorl/flyer was very easy. Once everything was attached and adjusted, I spun a little bit of wool. And whoa! I couldn’t believe how fast it went! The yarn was the thinnest I’ve ever spun on a wheel. You really have to back off on the tension and the treadling isn’t quite as effortless as when you use the standard Aura flyer/whorl, but it was still pleasant and successful. After that initial test run I spun a few other experimental things before settling on some black alpaca. I put the drive band on the highest whorl and went from there. Of course it’s not perfect, but I still feel pretty happy with it. Right now I am waiting for an Akerworks Majacraft Baby Bobbin to arrive before plying these together. I discovered that plying onto my jumbo bobbins with the low whorl presents challenges, so I took the opportunity to finally get an Akerworks bobbin. More to come!

bobbins
Bobbins

a new family portrait

wheels

If you follow me on Instagram, you may have noticed that the new wheel has arrived and it is a Majacraft Aura. It came on Thursday, March 27. That morning I finally received a tracking number from the Woolery. It was being sent directly from the Majacraft workshop in New Zealand, and I hadn’t heard anything for almost four weeks. When I looked up the tracking, I discovered that it had already traveled from California to Ohio, and I spent all day Thursday watching its slow progress from Cleveland to my local office. It was agonizing! Around the end of the day, I got a notice that it wouldn’t be delivered until Friday. Unacceptable! I would be leaving early that morning to go to Pittsburgh for the festival and didn’t want to wait until Sunday night to open the box. So I called the post office to ask if I would be able to pick it up. They said yes. But they’ve done this to me before — saying on the phone that I could pick up a package, but refusing to give it to me when I get there. I got myself so worked up on the car ride over, preparing myself for a fight. But thankfully the box was waiting for me and I took it home!

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Even though I had plenty to do that afternoon (we were leaving at 8 am the following day, but luckily the car was already packed), I wasn’t going to leave that box unopened. I was able to get it put together without too much anguish. There were a few parts of the instructions that were oddly vague, but in the end I was able to get some yarn on it before having to resume my packing. From the beginning Olive had decided it was her wheel.

olive01

When I got home from the show I continued to fiddle around with the settings. It didn’t feel great at first and I was disappointed. The treadling wasn’t as smooth as I had imagined it would be (did I mention I did not have the chance to try this wheel before I bought it?). I think I was feeling overwhelmed by the newness of it all. I chose this wheel because I wanted something that was different from the wheels I’d had in the past. Everything else had been scotch tension and this was a double drive! Why buy a new piece of equipment that is the same as what you’ve already got? So basically I got what I asked for and now I had to figure out how to use it. I read about other people’s experiences on a Ravelry forum and was able to make adjustments that helped. Feeling more confident, I decided it was time to spin in earnest.

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My first yarn off the new wheel was a 2-ply of Blue-faced Leicester locks and a mohair single. I guess I just wanted to jump right in there and see what this thing could do, so why not curly locks AND a thin yarn AND plying? I hadn’t spun locks in so long, so for just that reason I love the way the yarn turned out. I also love that the curls didn’t have anywhere to get snagged on. The sliding loop thingy is great. No more peaks and valleys created by the hooks. The delta/pig tale orifice is nice too. It’s just cool and weird. It really holds the thinner yarns in place and you can wrap around it twice to lessen the tension. Another thing I noticed (not sure if this is specific to this wheel, double drives, or random chance) and love is that the yarn packs down so tightly. I used to hate how fluffy the bulky yarns were on the bobbin. So much wasted space! I’m still working on bulky yarns. I am finding it easier to spin thinner yarns than chunky, so there is still a lot of work to be done.

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The second finished yarn was a mohair/Merino blend that I couldn’t resist buying or spinning. Such a gorgeous luster. Ugh! It was wonderful to spin on the wheel. I have never been great at spinning anything below worsted weight, and this might be a light worsted if I’m lucky. But it was enjoyable and doable. At some point I may get another whorl with higher ratios for finer spinning, but even on the highest ratio I can spin finer than I expected. It’s exciting!

Did I mention Olive has claimed the wheel?

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change is in the air!

new wheel

After a great deal of deliberation and anxiety, I decided it was time to order my new wheel. At first I thought I needed to sell off everything else I had in order to justify the purchase. However, after thinking about how many times I wished I had a second wheel to spin a different type of yarn while I was in the middle of a project, I realized that keeping the Kromski wasn’t foolish.

As far as which wheel I chose, that will remain a surprise. If you can tell from the image above, good for you! Keep it to yourself for now. When the box arrives in 2-4 weeks, all will be revealed!

The process of deciding to invest in a new wheel opened up my mind. I have been feeling disappointed in my spinning abilities lately. I look at yarn from a few years ago and it looks better than that which is being spun currently. Could it be that my skills have not only plateaued, but degraded? After 10 years I should feel like I am progressing, but that is not the case. It was easy to blame my struggles on the equipment. But if I get this new wheel and nothing changes, then what?! That is when I decided it was time for a refresher course. As I spend the next few weeks waiting for my new wheel to appear on the doorstep, I will read my spinning books as if I have never seen the words before. It is time to refocus. I have always neglected the mechanics, but this is a great time to hone in on ways to improve. I want to be prepared for the challenge of the new wheel, but I also want to improve my usage of the Kromski. I think The Intentional Spinner by Judith MacKenzie McCuin is a great place to start!

temptations + upgrade

Majacraft Suzie

When I first started exploring spinning wheels (back in 2005) I found myself at a wee little shop in Wadsworth, OH. She carried Majacraft wheels and I got to try one. Even though I had very very little experience, I could tell it was a kick ass piece of machinery. But Majacraft are some of the highest priced wheels out there – easily $1000 in today’s market. And as a college student, I did not have the job or sugar daddy to buy it for me. That’s how I ended up with my Ashford Traditional. It was a used wheel and only cost $250. Much more manageable. A few years later and with a bit more money saved, I upgraded to the Kromski Sonata. I was ready for a new wheel and that one was there. I liked that it folded up and had an old fashioned style. Plus it was around $500 (they’ve gone up in price too!). Since then I’ve gotten the jumbo and lace flyers. It’s the wheel I use every day, but I find myself struggling with it. I can’t quite pinpoint the problem, so it’s hard to know how to solve it. But lately I’ve been rethinking a Majacraft wheel. Partly because how can you not want a new wheel?! But also for an upgrade.

When I have issues with equipment, I often think that getting something better will solve all my problems. But it’s me. Someone who is really talented can make awesome stuff regardless of the tools. Buying a new drumcarder did make my batts larger and cleaner, but I’m still the one who selects the fibers. In the end they are still the same boring batts they always were, they’re just blended better. I feel the same with the wheel – even if I were to get a new wheel with more options, I’m still the one who is working the thing. If I don’t know what I’m doing, it won’t matter what sort of equipment I have.

And there is also the cost. The Suzie Pro (pictured above) is around $995 at the Woolery right now. They also have the Overdrive head available for a mere $383. So many options. Perhaps too many. I would feel obligated to sell my Kromski. Do I really need four wheels clogging my house? Selling it would only cover half the cost of the new wheel! Do I even care enough about this to invest so much? I need to find a place where I can try one again. I see a road trip in my future. It would be kind of cool to finally be able to get that wheel I wanted when I first started but couldn’t afford. To be continued.

spinning wheel for sale

Currently I have this beautiful Country Craftsman Spinning Wheel sitting in my  living room. It was hand-crafted by Joseph Franzek, Jr. from Littleton, Massachusetts. Despite its alluring charm, I do not have a use for it. I am hoping to help it find a new forever home this weekend at the Autumn Fiber Festival in Ashland, OH. I am asking $325 and it comes with a matching stool and distaff. Stop in my booth to give it a whirl.

Country Craftsman

Detta’s Spindle has a few accessories available.

friday’s question

I love to sit on the front porch in the summer and spin. And if I could do it more often, I would go to an alpaca farm and set up right next to the pasture where the animals are grazing. But under normal circumstance, I spin in the living room. I’ve found that I am most productive if I keep my wheel in a place where I already spend a lot of time. It used to sit at the picture window when I lived with my parents. I enjoyed the view, but I was always removed from the family when they were downstairs watching TV.  These days Rich has his hand on the remote control and I can focus on the spinning without being alone in another room. If I was there by myself, I’d put on a movie or music so I wouldn’t be tempted to continually change the channel on the TV. Sitting in absolute silence is not appealing to me, unless I can enjoy the sounds of nature.

Question: Where is your favorite place to spin? Where is your most productive place to spin? Do you play music or put on a movie? Do you prefer to sit in silence and meditate solely on the wheel?

compelled to try

Newsflash! I have a short attention span. And that might just be the main reason I end up spinning fat yarn… because I can’t be bothered to take the time to spin finer. Plus I don’t think I treadle fast enough even on the highest ratio. Which is why I am thinking about getting the lace flyer for my wheel, but I also need to use my lightweight drop spindle more often.

Well, I forced myself to suffer through [merely] four ounces of Falkland, spinning it finer than normal in order to navajo-ply it and not end up with a heavy weight yarn. That bobbin is so FULL.

Falkland single

But this one is filling up much quicker!

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a petite homemaker

All that time I spent collecting and stashing household goodies… it has all led to this! Rich and I are now finally settling into our little apartment. My cupboards are full of green Pyrex and I don’t have to feel guilty about decorating the living room with wool.

While we were on our honeymoon, we stopped at several antique malls. I found some special things including this wonderful linen tablecloth. During some intense browsing, I came across a pile of linens, and just happened to pull this one out without knowing its special hidden secret. A wheel! Of course I couldn’t pass up something with a spinning wheel on it! When we got home I put it on the table immediately. An unexpected bonus: it’s inspiring me keep the table clean.

table cloth

big fat yarn

This guy ended up in my photostream February 19, but I didn’t say anything about it. It’s a Country Spinner and it belongs to Cosy. I took it home after a day of spinning to see if anyone in Ohio could get it working. Treadling was more or less impossible, the wheel is warped, and the driveband kept slipping. I told my dad to consider making a new wheel, which seemed doable to him. In the meantime, though, Richard had a closer look at it. And he put a rubber band around the bobbin, where the driveband was slipping. Amazingly, it worked! (Note: I am not amazed that he fixed it, I’m amazed it was that simple. He was offended that I thought he couldn’t fix it).

country spinner

Which leads to these two gigantor skeins of yarn. They are both the weirdo free wool from Indiana that I wasn’t sure what to do with because it’s short and obnoxious.  Apparently spinning it huge is the solution. The 2ply I dyed with koolaid after spinning. It weighs 4 ounces and could be 50 yards (I don’t remember). The natural singles weighs a whopping 7 ounces! Maybe 100 yards? I think I’ll just spin the remainder of the fiber as such.

big mama

fat singles